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I Ve Had A Sinus Infection For 2 Months

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How Is Chronic Sinusitis Treated

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Chronic sinusitis is not usually caused by a bacterial infection, but it can be. If your healthcare provider really thinks that you have a bacterial infection, they might give you a prescription for something like amoxicillin. Antibiotics only help for bacterial infections. Other ways to treat non-bacterial chronic sinusitis include:

  • Avoiding triggers .
  • Using intranasal corticosteroid sprays and leukotriene antagonists or antifungal medication to get rid of a fungus.
  • Treating the underlying condition, such as allergies, asthma, and/or immune deficiency conditions, with medications such as topical antihistamine, or steroid, sprays or antihistamine pills.
  • Having surgery . Fungal balls are clumps of fungal infection that block sinuses.
  • Having a procedure called balloon sinus ostial dilation, which inserts a balloon into a sinus cavity to open it further and make more room.

How Is A Sinus Infection Diagnosed And Treated

Your doctor will give you a physical exam and take your medical history. You might get a CT scan of your sinuses.

Your doctor may prescribe medication. They may recommend antibiotics if your symptoms go on for more than 10 days. , antihistamines, and other drugs help lessen the swelling in your sinuses and nasal passages.

Steam and hot showers can help you loosen mucus. Your doctor may also suggest nasal saline to wash mucus from your nose.

In rare cases, when a sinus infection doesn’t go away, long-term antibiotics or surgery may be needed.

How Is Sinus Infection Diagnosed

Diagnosis depends on symptoms and requires an examination of the throat, nose and sinuses. Your allergist will look for:

  • Redness
  • Discolored nasal discharge
  • Bad Breath

If your sinus infection lasts longer than eight weeks, or if standard antibiotic treatment is not working, a sinus CT scan may help your allergist diagnose the problem. Your allergist may examine your nose or sinus openings. The exam uses a long, thin, flexible tube with a tiny camera and a light at one end that is inserted through the nose. It is not painful. Your allergist may give you a light anesthetic nasal spray to make you more comfortable.

Mucus cultures: If your sinus infection is chronic or has not improved after several rounds of antibiotics, a mucus culture may help to determine what is causing the infection. Most mucus samples are taken from the nose. However, it is sometimes necessary to get mucus directly from the sinuses.

Knowing what kind of bacteria is causing the infection can lead to more effective antibiotic therapy. A fungus could also cause your sinus infection. Confirming the presence of fungus is important. Fungal sinus infection needs to be treated with antifungal agents, rather than antibiotics. In addition, some forms of fungal sinus infection allergic fungal sinus infection, for example do not respond to antifungal agents and often require the use of oral steroids.

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How Do You Diagnose Chronic Sinusitis

The presence of two or more of the listed symptoms for at least three months raises the suspicion of a chronic sinus infection.

In such cases, we will evaluate you to confirm the diagnosis. This involves applying pressure on your sinuses to elicit tenderness. If the tenderness is positive, your sinuses are likely to be inflamed. We will then take a peek into your nose using a small flexible scope, and check for nasal polyps, pus-filled discharge, and deviated septum.

We may also recommend nasal endoscopy. This is an office procedure that enables us to view the interior of your nose and sinus passages. Its done with an instrument called an endoscope, which is a thin, flexible tube with a tiny camera and a light. We will pass this scope into your nose and sinuses to look inside. Nasal endoscopy allows us to detect any swelling and polyps, as well as collect discharge from the infected area. This can help spot the cause of your infection and whats the best way to treat it.

If need be, we may also perform imaging in the form of a computed tomography to look for further problems.

Allergy skin tests look for allergic causes and to check for problems within your immune system may also be done.

What Can I Do To Find Relief From A Sinus Infection

Pin on Sinus Infection? Bad Cold? Flu? Chest Congestion?
  • Place a warm compress over your face to help relieve pressure.
  • Breathe in steam by placing a towel over your head and leaning over a bowl or sink full of hot water to allow the steam to relieve congestion. WARNING: Make sure that the water is not too hot because steam can cause burns.
  • Rinse the sinuses. Dr. Takashima recommends using the squeeze bottle over the neti pot for effective nasal irrigation.
  • Keep the nasal passages moist by using a saline nasal spray.
  • Rest.
  • Use a humidifier to add moisture to the air.

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Symptoms Of Sinus Infection

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, cold symptoms such as nasal discharge and a cough that lasts more than ten days without any improvement, indicate a sinus infection .

Check for the following symptoms of sinus infection in babies:

  • Nasal congestion or cold that lasts for more than ten to 14 days.
  • Green-yellow discharge from the nose for more than four days.
  • A bad cough in the daytime that becomes worse at night.
  • Swelling around nose and eyes.
  • Dark circles around the eyes.
  • Irritability
  • Note: A low-grade fever is a body temperature above 100.4°F or 38°C and below 103°F or 39.4°C.

    In rare cases, a bacterial sinus infection could spread to the central nervous system or the eye, showing symptoms such as:

    • Increasing irritability
    • Swelling and/or redness around the eyes
    • Sensitivity to light

    Keep a check on your babys symptoms and do not delay in consulting a pediatrician. In case your baby has been suffering from chronic sinusitis, immediate medical intervention is warranted. Chronic sinusitis can significantly impact the quality of life.

    Do I Have Chronic Sinusitis

    Sinusitis is when the tissue in the sinus cavities is swollen or inflamed. It can be caused by a few conditions. The most common is a viral infection, such as a cold, that does not go away. Bacteria, allergies, or other causes may be responsible.

    Chronic sinusitis, also called chronic rhinosinusitis, is a particularly persistent type of sinusitis. If it lasts for more than 12 weeks, its considered chronic sinusitis, whereas if it is an isolated case that goes away on its own within a few weeks, it is called acute sinusitis .1

    Chronic sinusitis can affect your quality of life. It may cause discomfort, trouble breathing through your nose, problems sleeping, and other issues. If you have persistent sinus problems, you may benefit from having them treated by a doctor.

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    Almost 90 Percent Still Have At Least One Symptom Long After The Virus Has Gone

    by John Timmer – Jul 12, 2020 5:56 pm UTC

    As the COVID-19 pandemic continues unabated in many countries, an ever-growing group of people is being shifted from the “infected” to the “recovered” category. But are they truly recovered? A lot of anecdotal reports have indicated that many of those with severe infections are experiencing a difficult recovery, with lingering symptoms, some of which remain debilitating. Now, there’s a small study out of Italy in which a group of infected people was tracked for an average of 60 days after their infection was discovered. And the study confirms that symptoms remain long after there’s no detectable virus.

    The study was incredibly simple in design. Patients being treated in Rome for COVID-19 were asked to participate in a tracking study. Overall, 143 patients agreed and were enrolled in the study following a negative test for the presence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The group ranged from 19 to 85 years old, with an average age of 57. Overall, they had spent an average of 13 days in the hospital while infected, and about 20 percent had needed assistance with breathing.

    Roughly 60 days later, the researchers followed up with an assessment of these patients. Two months after there was no detectable virus, only 13 percent of the study group was free of any COVID-19 symptoms. By contrast, a bit over half still had at least three symptoms typical of the disease.

    When To Visit An Ent

    Does your child have a virus or a bacterial infections?

    You may opt to visit an ENT if your sinus infection symptoms last more than one month. However, when a lingering sinus infection after antibiotics lasts more than 12 weeks, its definitely time to see a specialist.

    If your doctor has treated you with antibiotics, saline, steroid sprays, antihistamines, and decongestants and youre still not better, youve entered into a confusing area. You need a thorough exam of your sinus pathways with a fiberoptic scope and a CT scan to properly diagnose the problem.

    If at any point youre not sure whats going on and your primary care doctor isnt sure whats causing the symptoms, see an ENT for a more specialized exam.

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    How Do Sinus Infections Start

    Sinusitis occurs when the lining of the sinus or nasal cavity becomes inflamed. What can start as inflammation in your sinuses from a respiratory infection, allergies or environmental pollutants can spark a sinus infection when the lining of the sinuses becomes inflamed and swollen, causing mucus to become trapped and germs to grow.

    “Once you have a cold or upper respiratory tract infection, that virus can then settle into the sinuses and cause inflammation as well,” said Dr. Mas Takashima, an otolaryngologist and chair of Houston Methodist ENT Specialists. “About 95% of sinusitis is caused by a virus making it much more common than bacterial sinusitis. Viral sinusitis is also much more infectious as well.”

    Certain conditions, such as having allergies, asthma or a respiratory infection, can make people more susceptible to getting chronic sinus infections, and it is important that these patients be evaluated to address the cause and not just the sinusitis symptoms.

    “There are many causes of chronic sinusitis. “Patients with a weakened immune system are more prone to getting recurrent acute sinusitis,” explains Dr. Takashima. “Sometimes, however, the issue may be anatomy, such as a deviated septum , scarring from previous sinus surgery, or nasal polyps, which result from chronic inflammation in the nose. Once the polyps get to a certain size, they rarely regress on their own and they narrow the sinus drainage pathways.”

    W S Tichenor M Dnew York New York212

    This section is written primarily for those patients who have had endoscopic sinus surgery and despite surgery, symptoms have continued. We will not address the immediate post-operative complications as those should be satisfactorily addressed by the Otolaryngologist and can include such things as excessive bleeding, infection, perforation into the brain or eye, etc. This time generally extends up to approximately 3-6 weeks after surgery.

    Basic principals of treatment after surgery are essentially the same as the pre-surgical treatment: To ensure adequate drainage from the sinuses. It is unrealistic to expect that surgery will cure sinusitis, as the same processes which occurred prior to surgery will continue afterwards. Surgical treatment simply allows the sinuses, which previously did not drain, to drain through the ostia.

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    Lingering Sinus Infection Or Chronic Runny Nose

    A lingering sinus infection is different from a chronic runny nose. Chronic runny nose typically comes from allergies or other irritants in the air. However, this can turn into an infection over time.

    When the sinuses become infected, the allergies, irritants, or viral cold have caused swelling in the nose thats blocked the drainage pathways. Consequently, fluid and mucous accumulate in the sinuses, where it has become infected with bacteria.

    If youve been sick more than 10 days and begin to experience other symptoms like facial pressure, headache, and fever, youre dealing with more than a chronic runny nose.

    What Is A Common Cold

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    It’s an illness caused by many different kinds of viruses, which are tiny infectious particles.

    You can’t miss the symptoms:

    You may also get a cough and a mild fever. The symptoms usually build, peak, and slowly disappear. Some medications can ease symptoms. For example, may decrease drainage and open the nasal passages. Pain relievers may help with fever and headache. Cough medicine may help, as well.

    Colds typically last from a few days to about a week or longer.

    Sometimes, a cold may cause swelling in the sinuses, hollow spaces in your skull that are connected to each other. The swelling can prevent the flow of mucus.

    This can lead to a sinus infection. If you have pain around your face and eyes — and thick yellow or green mucus for more than a week — see your doctor.

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    Medications And Specialist Treatment

    Over-the-counter pain medications can help relieve the pain of a headache or pressure from swelling. These include ibuprofen or acetaminophen . Nasal sprays with corticosteroids also help with inflammation. OTC sprays include fluticasone and mometasone . Nasal sprays can also help make nasal polyps get smaller. This will help you breathe better if theyâre blocking your nasal passages.

    If your sinusitis is caused by an infection, your doctor may prescribe an antibiotic to treat the infection and relieve some of your symptoms. Chronic sinusitis isnât often caused by an infection, but serious infections that result in sinusitis may require antibiotic treatment to prevent complications.

    If your chronic sinusitis is caused by allergies, your doctor may refer you to an allergist. An allergist can conduct tests to figure out what youâre allergic to. They can then give you regular allergy shots to gradually allow your body to become immune to those allergens. Allergy shots may not take effect until several years after beginning the treatment, but they can help relieve allergy symptoms drastically in the long term.

    How Do I Treat Chronic Sinusitis

    Chronic sinusitis is much more difficult to treat than acute bacterial sinusitis. You may have been sick for months and may have received several courses of antibiotics. Over time, the bacteria become immune to the antibiotics, and you may become allergic to certain antibiotics. Steroids tend to be the most helpful medicine for chronic sinusitis, as they reduce the swelling that causes nasal and sinus blockage. Despite aggressive medical management, many patients with chronic sinusitis require surgical cleaning of their sinuses. New techniques such as balloon sinus dilation make it possible to wash out the sinuses under local anesthesia in the office. Most patients have very little pain and return to work the day after balloon dilation.

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    What Are The Signs And Symptoms Of Chronic Sinus Infection

    Chronic sinusitis emerges more insidiously than acute sinusitis. At times, however, the symptoms start suddenly and may resemble that of the common cold or acute sinusitis that just wont go away.

    Chronic sinusitis is most likely if you have two or more of the following symptoms:

    • Nasal congestion or stuffy nose
    • Mucus and pus-like discharge
    • Postnasal drip
    • Facial pain, pressure around your eyes and nose, or fullness
    • Partial or complete loss of your sense of smell

    Chronic cough, sore throat, and fatigue may also be seen in a chronic sinus infection. That said, these symptoms are not required for the diagnosis of chronic rhinosinusitis.

    What Are The Different Types Of Sinus Infections

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    Sinusitis is categorized based on how long the condition lasts as well as its frequency:

    • Acute sinusitis usually lasts a few weeks, but less than a month. There is a subcategory of acute sinusitis, called recurrent acute sinusitis, which occurs when someone gets four or more sinus infections in a year, with symptoms resolving after each one.
    • Subacute sinusitis lasts one to three months.
    • Chronic sinusitis lasts three months or more.

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    What Causes A Sinus Infection

    In most cases, acute sinusitis is caused by a bacterial or viral infection, which means it usually develops after youve had a cold or the flu. Its possible for an acute sinus infection to develop into a chronic infection over time. However, most chronic sinus infections are caused by:

    Certain health conditions are also known to accompany chronic sinusitis. These include:

    • Asthma
    • Primary immune deficiency disesase

    How Do You Treat A Sinus Infection

    Treatment for acute and chronic sinus infections include self-care, over-the-counter and prescription medications, and sinus surgery, if necessary, to enlarge the opening to the sinuses or address other anatomical issues.

    Your doctor may also recommend a combination of over-the-counter and prescription medications, including:

    • Antibiotics
    • Over-the-counter pain relievers, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen
    • Steroid nasal sprays
    • Saline nasal irrigations

    Patients with sinusitis often go to the doctor expecting to get a prescription for an antibiotic. If you have signs of a sinus infection, talk to your doctor about whether an antibiotic is appropriate to treat the type of infection that you have. Dr. Takashima warns that we must be vigilant about not treating viral infections with antibiotics, which only work on bacterial infections, to prevent creating superbugs antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

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    Scar Tissue In The Sinus Cavities

    Previous injuries, anatomic defects from birth, or previous sinus injections can all cause scar tissue to build up in the sinuses. This blocks the cavities from functioning and draining properly, which can trap irritants in the cavity. Recurrent sinus infections can continue causing more scar tissue, further compounding the problem.

    If Dr. Hester notices that scar tissue is impacting sinus function, he may recommend endoscopic sinus surgery to clear the tissue away.

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