Saturday, November 26, 2022

Sinus Infection For 3 Weeks

Must read

Can I Prevent Sinusitis

Chronic Sinusitis – Sinusitis Treatment – Sinusitis Symptoms

There is no sure-fire way to prevent sinusitis. But there are some things that might help.

  • Donât smoke, and avoid other people’s smoke.
  • Wash your hands often, especially during cold and flu season, and try not to touch your face.
  • Stay away from things you know youâre allergic to. Talk to your doctor to see if you need prescription medicines, allergy shots, or other forms of immunotherapy.

If your sinus problems keep coming back, ask your doctor about the pros and cons of surgery to clean and drain the sinuses.

Sinus Infection Now For 3 Weeks

Link2018

Came on suddenly when driving – felt I was going to faint I continued to work until I couldn’t went to the dr’s a week after the nearly fainting and was told I had a sinus infection – had pains all over my face around my eye by that time – and so dizzy I couldn’t walk anywhere. I was put on antibiotics which helped me a lot – however I tried going back to work but was still bad – I got signed off from work and given more antibiotics which I have just run out of. I have I think a “dry sinus” as there doesn’t appear to be much mucus coming out. I have been doing salt water rinses and even got a humidifier for in the bedroom to help. taking pain killers however it still hasn’t gone after 3 weeks. I’m so fed up of feeling dizzy and tired. how long has it taken people to get over this as I’m not able to function like this I’ve started taking evening primrose oil today hoping that will help

1 like, 19 replies

  • Posted 4 years ago

  • Posted 4 years ago

    please let me know if it helps – fingers crossed – its the headaches and dizzy spells that are getting to me – also getting fizzy nose when I blow it

  • Posted 4 years ago

    thanks for you advice and tips – interestingly I had an ear infection last year and was no where near as bad as what I’m currently going through. I recovered within 9 days. This so far has been 21+ days and I’m so ill with it

  • I am currently using steroid spray given me by ENT. Still bad taste smell.

    best wishes

  • What Happens If A Sinus Infection Is Left Untreated

    For some lucky people, sinus infections may go away if left untreated. Rest and hydration will certainly help with this.

    For others, however, sinusitis wont go away until you seek treatment. If this is the case, a sinus infection left untreated may cause further complications .

    When sinusitis spreads to areas around the eyes, you may experience redness and swelling, which can reduce vision. The most severe form of sinusitis reaching the eye is called cavernous sinus thrombosis and can actually cause blindness. It is treated by antibiotics and drainage of sinus fluids.

    Sinusitis that reaches the brain may cause meningitis and brain abscesses.

    You May Like: How Does Infection Cause Sickle Cell Crisis

    Scar Tissue In The Sinus Cavities

    Previous injuries, anatomic defects from birth, or previous sinus injections can all cause scar tissue to build up in the sinuses. This blocks the cavities from functioning and draining properly, which can trap irritants in the cavity. Recurrent sinus infections can continue causing more scar tissue, further compounding the problem.

    If Dr. Hester notices that scar tissue is impacting sinus function, he may recommend endoscopic sinus surgery to clear the tissue away.

    Other Remedies For Symptom Relief

    Sinus Surgery

    Staying hydrated can help thin mucus to ease congestion.

    Drinking hot liquids such as tea and broth may help relieve your symptoms. Breathing in moist air may also help relieve the discomfort that comes with nasal congestion. Try breathing in steam from the shower, a bowl of hot water, or a mug of tea.

    If your voice is hoarse, rest it by avoiding yelling, whispering, and singing.

    Placing a warm compress over the inflamed area can help reduce pressure and provide relief.

    damages the natural protective elements of your nose, mouth, throat, and respiratory system.

    If you smoke, consider quitting. Ask a doctor if you need help or are interested in quitting. Quitting may help prevent future episodes of both acute and chronic sinusitis.

    Wash your hands frequently, especially during cold and flu seasons, to keep your sinuses from becoming irritated or infected by viruses or bacteria on your hands.

    Using a humidifier during the cooler, dryer months may also help prevent sinus infections.

    Talk with a doctor to see if allergies are causing your sinusitis. If youre allergic to something that causes persistent sinus symptoms, you will likely need to treat your allergies to relieve your sinus infection.

    You may need to seek an allergy specialist to determine the cause of the allergy. The specialist may suggest:

    • avoiding the allergen

    Dont Miss: Tension Headache Or Sinus Headache

    You May Like: How To Deal With Tooth Infection Pain

    Is It A Sinus Infection Or Cold

    It can be difficult to tell the difference between a sinus infection and a cold as the symptoms can be very similar. Sinus infections often develop after a cold.

    Sinusitis tends to last longer than a cold. Cold symptoms tend to get steadily worse, peaking at 35 days, then gradually get better. Sinus infections may last 10 days or more.

    Some symptoms are more likely to be caused by sinusitis than a cold, including:

    • swelling of the tissue in the nose
    • green discharge from the nose
    • a swollen or tender face

    Unlike a cold, sinusitis can become chronic, which means it lasts longer than eight weeks. Chronic sinusitis causes swelling and irritation in the sinuses and usually develops after a person has had acute sinusitis. Sometimes the symptoms go away and then come back again.

    Ongoing sinus symptoms even if they get better and then come back may indicate chronic sinusitis.

    Sinus infections often go away on their own without medical treatment. There are, however, some things a person can do at home to relieve the bothersome symptoms.

    To treat sinusitis symptoms with home remedies , try:

    Avoid using decongestants on a long-term basis without talking to a doctor first because they can make congestion worse if used for too long.

    • symptoms last longer than 10 days with no improvement
    • fever lasts longer than 3-4 days
    • the pain is very intense
    • a person with a suspected sinus infection has a drugs that suppress the immune system, or organ failure

    When To Worry About Your Lingering Sinus Infection

    Philip Scolaro, MD

    Sinus infections have a way of making time stand still in a bad way. When youre constantly congested, battling headaches, and feeling sinus pressure, even a short duration of sickness can feel like its never going to end.

    What if it doesnt? If your lingering sinus infection becomes chronic, it may be time for more aggressive treatment.

    Heres what you need to know about sinus infections and when its time to take the next step in treatment.

    Also Check: Where To Go For Yeast Infection

    When To Seek Medical Care

    See a doctor if you have:

    • Severe symptoms, such as severe headache or facial pain.
    • Symptoms that get worse after improving.
    • Symptoms lasting more than 10 days without getting better.
    • Fever longer than 3-4 days.

    You should also seek medical care if you have had multiple sinus infections in the past year.

    This list is not all-inclusive. Please see a doctor for any symptom that is severe or concerning.

    Other conditions can cause symptoms similar to a sinus infection, including:

    • Seasonal allergies

    What Are The Signs And Symptoms Of Chronic Sinus Infection

    SINUS INFECTION IS IT ACUTE OR CHRONIC?#medicalstudent #medicalfacts #pharmafacts

    Chronic sinusitis emerges more insidiously than acute sinusitis. At times, however, the symptoms start suddenly and may resemble that of the common cold or acute sinusitis that just wont go away.

    Chronic sinusitis is most likely if you have two or more of the following symptoms:

    • Nasal congestion or stuffy nose
    • Mucus and pus-like discharge
    • Facial pain, pressure around your eyes and nose, or fullness
    • Partial or complete loss of your sense of smell

    Chronic cough, sore throat, and fatigue may also be seen in a chronic sinus infection. That said, these symptoms are not required for the diagnosis of chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Also Check: Will Bladder Infection Go Away On Its Own

    What Are The Treatment Options

    If you take your child to an ENT specialist, or otolaryngologist, they will examine your childs ears, nose, and throat. A thorough history and examination usually leads to the correct diagnosis. The doctor may also look for factors that make your child more likely to get a sinus infection, including structural changes, allergies, and problems with the immune system.

    Occasionally, special instruments will be used to look into the nose during the office visit. Imaging of the sinuses, such as a CT scan, are not recommended in acute sinusitis unless there are complications from the infection. Radiation safety concerns may limit imaging scans, especially in children younger than six-years-old.2

    Acute sinusitisWhen bacterial sinusitis is present, most children respond very well to antibiotic therapy. Nasal steroid sprays or nasal saline drops or gentle sprays may also be prescribed for short-term relief of stuffiness. Over-the-counter decongestants and antihistamines are generally not effective for viral upper respiratory infections in children, and should not be given to children younger than two-years-old.

    Chronic sinusitisIf your child suffers from two or more symptoms of sinusitis for at least 12 weeks and has signs of sinus pressure, he or she may have chronic sinusitis.3 Chronic sinusitis or more than four to six episodes of acute sinusitis per year indicates that you should see an ENT specialist, who can recommend appropriate medical or surgical treatment.

    css id:

    Pain Or Pressure In Your Sinuses

    Facial pain is a common symptom of sinusitis. You have several different sinuses above and below your eyes, as well as behind your nose. Any of these air-filled cavities can hurt when you have a sinus infection.

    Inflammation and swelling can cause your sinuses to ache with dull pressure. This is because inflammation may alter the typical path of mucus from the nose to the back of the throat.

    You may feel pain in:

    • on either side of your nose
    • in your upper jaws and teeth
    • between your eyes

    This may lead to a headache. Headaches caused by sinus infections can occur where the sinuses are or in other places.

    You May Like: Can Malware Infect A Smartphone

    Mayo Clinic Q & A: Chronic Sinusitis Symptoms Resemble A Cold But Last Months

    DEAR MAYO CLINIC: Ive had an awful cold for months. My doctor recommends that I be tested for chronic sinusitis. What would that involve? How is chronic sinusitis treated?

    ANSWER: Sinusitis is inflammation of the sinuses, which are the air-containing pockets in the skull and facial bones around your nose. Chronic sinusitis develops when inflammation lasts for more than 12 weeks. Testing involves a visit to an ear, nose and throat, or ENT, doctor who will examine your sinuses. Most chronic sinusitis can be managed with medical therapy. However, if your symptoms or the inflammation do not respond to medical therapy, surgery may be necessary. The goal of treatment is to restore sinus health and function.

    Symptoms of chronic sinusitis often resemble a cold. A cold is usually caused by a viral infection and is often accompanied by a runny or stuffed-up nose, sneezing, sore throat, watery eyes and a fever. This kind of acute viral sinusitis usually lasts seven to 10 days.

    In rare instances, you may get a bacterial infection as a result of a cold, resulting in acute bacterial sinusitis. If that happens, cold symptoms get worse after seven to 10 days. You also may have yellow or green nasal drainage, pain in your face or teeth, and a fever. Acute sinusitis lasts up to four weeks. When symptoms persist for more than 12 weeks, you may have chronic sinusitis. But some cases of chronic sinusitis can develop subtly, without a preceding viral infection.

    What Questions Should I Ask My Doctor

    How to Manage Sinusitis Naturally
  • What is the most appropriate antibiotic to use to treat a sinus infection in my child?
  • What are the complications from a sinus infection that I should be aware of for my child?
  • How do you prevent sinusitis from occurring?
  • Should I have my child tested for allergies?
  • References

  • Wald, ER, et al. Clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis and management of acute bacterial sinusitis in children aged 1 to 18 years Pediatrics. 2013 132:e261-80
  • Setzen G, Ferguson BJ, Han JK, et al., Clinical consensus statement: appropriate use of computed tomography for paranasal sinus disease, Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2012 Nov 147:808-16. doi: 10.1177/0194599812463848. Epub 2012 Oct 10.
  • Brietzke SE1, Shin JJ2, Choi S3, Clinical consensus statement: pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis, Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2014 Oct 151:542-53. doi: 10.1177/0194599814549302.
  • Brietzke SE et al. Clinical Consensus Statement: Pediatric Chronic Rhinosinusitis. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2014 151.
  • Dont Miss: Prescription Nasal Spray For Sinus Infection

    Read Also: Best Antibiotic For Piercing Infection

    Birth Of A Sinus Infection

    Most people dont give much thought to their sinuses. Yet these little air-filled facial chambers have an important job to do. When you breathe through your nose, your sinuses go to work filtering pollutants, allergens and other irritants. If your sinus cavities are swollen and inflamed due to a cold, mucus can become trapped and create a breeding ground for infection.

    How Is Sinus Infection Diagnosed

    Diagnosis depends on symptoms and requires an examination of the throat, nose and sinuses. Your allergist will look for:

    • Discolored nasal discharge

    If your sinus infection lasts longer than eight weeks, or if standard antibiotic treatment is not working, a sinus CT scan may help your allergist diagnose the problem. Your allergist may examine your nose or sinus openings. The exam uses a long, thin, flexible tube with a tiny camera and a light at one end that is inserted through the nose. It is not painful. Your allergist may give you a light anesthetic nasal spray to make you more comfortable.

    Mucus cultures: If your sinus infection is chronic or has not improved after several rounds of antibiotics, a mucus culture may help to determine what is causing the infection. Most mucus samples are taken from the nose. However, it is sometimes necessary to get mucus directly from the sinuses.

    Knowing what kind of bacteria is causing the infection can lead to more effective antibiotic therapy. A fungus could also cause your sinus infection. Confirming the presence of fungus is important. Fungal sinus infection needs to be treated with antifungal agents, rather than antibiotics. In addition, some forms of fungal sinus infection allergic fungal sinus infection, for example do not respond to antifungal agents and often require the use of oral steroids.

    Also Check: Best Treatment For Bronchitis And Sinus Infection

    Is The Color Of Your Mucus Important

    Many believe that the color of your mucus changes depending on if you are suffering from a bacterial or viral infection. According to Dr. Donald Ford, a family medicine physician in Ohio, this is a myth.

    The green-yellow color of mucus that can develop is a byproduct of our own white blood cells, which we use to fight any kind of infection, viral or bacterial, so we cant tell the cause from the color of the mucus, he explained. When mucus is thick and dark it usually suggests some mild dehydration, and you should increase fluid intake and use lots of saline spray to keep the mucus thin.

    Some Steps You Can Take

    Symptoms and Treatment of Chronic Sinusitis

    Whether your sinus infection turns out to be viral or bacterial, you can help to ease your symptoms early on with supportive sinus care:

  • Use saline spray two to three times per day in each nostril.
  • Use a nasal decongestant such as Afrin®, but not longer than three days.
  • Drink eight 8-ounce glasses of fluid per day.
  • Get plenty of rest.
  • Take an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen to help relieve the swelling of your sinuses.
  • If your symptoms arent improving after one week, its important to see your doctor. If a bacterial infection is suspected, youll probably need to take an antibiotic to clear up the infection and prevent further complications.

    If your infections occur more frequently, and your doctor really wants to establish if they are bacterial or viral, your Otolaryngologist or ear, nose and throat doctor can sample the snot from your nose when youre infected and send it to a laboratory to know for sure.

    Note: Antibiotics wont help a viral infection, and taking an antibiotic unnecessarily can do more harm than good. You risk possible side effects and increase your chances of developing antibiotic resistance, which can make future infections harder to treat, says Dr. Sindwani. So its important to wait and see how long your symptoms last.

    Also Check: How To Kick A Sinus Infection Fast

    How You Can Treat Sinusitis Yourself

    You can often treat mild sinusitis without seeing a GP by:

    • getting plenty of rest
    • taking painkillers, such as paracetamol or ibuprofen
    • avoiding allergic triggers and not smoking
    • cleaning your nose with a salt water solution to ease congestion

    If you have a high temperature or you do not feel well enough to do your normal activities, try to stay at home and avoid contact with other people until you feel better.

  • Boil a pint of water, then leave it to cool.
  • Mix 1 teaspoon of salt and 1 teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda into the water.
  • Wash your hands.
  • Stand over a sink, cup the palm of 1 hand and pour a small amount of the solution into it.
  • Sniff the water into 1 nostril at a time. Breathe through your mouth and allow the water to pour back into the sink. Try not to let the water go down the back of your throat.
  • Repeat the first 5 steps up to 3 times a day until your nose feels more comfortable.
  • You do not need to use all of the solution, but make a fresh solution each time you clean your nose.

    More articles

    Popular Articles