Wednesday, December 7, 2022

Medical Term For Ear Infection

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How Long Does An Ear Infection Last

Middle Ear Infection (Acute Otitis Media) | Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

The pain from an ear infection comes on rapidly and doesn’t last long. It usually wears off within 24 hours.

After an ear infection, your child may have fluid behind their eardrum . This can last several weeks to months. It may cause your child to have a continuing feeling of discomfort in their ears. It is more a dull, abnormal feeling than a nasty, sharp pain. The fluid also causes a short-term decrease in hearing in that ear.

How To Use Ear Drops

  • Remove any visible discharge or earwax using cotton wool.
  • Hold the bottle in your hand to warm it. Cold ear drops can make you feel dizzy.
  • Lie on your side with the affected ear facing up to put the drops in.
  • Gently pull and push your ear to work the drops in.
  • Stay lying down for 5 minutes so the drops do not come out.

    Where Is The Middle Ear

    The middle ear is behind the eardrum and is also home to the delicate bones that aid in hearing. These bones are the hammer , anvil and stirrup . To provide the bigger picture, lets look at the whole structure and function of the ear:

    The ear structure and function

    There are three main parts of the ear: outer, middle and inner.

    • The outer ear is the outside external ear flap and the ear canal .
    • The middle ear is the air-filled space between the eardrum and the inner ear. The middle ear houses the delicate bones that transmit sound vibrations from the eardrum to the inner ear. This is where ear infections occur.
    • The inner ear contains the snail-shaped labyrinth that converts sound vibrations received from the middle ear to electrical signals. The auditory nerve carries these signals to the brain.

    Other nearby parts

    • The eustachian tube regulates air pressure within the middle ear, connecting it to the upper part of the throat.
    • Adenoids are small pads of tissue above the throat and behind the nose and near the eustachian tubes. Adenoids help fight infection caused by bacteria that enters through the mouth.

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    How Do Ear Infections Happen

    A middle ear infection usually happens because of swelling in one or both of the eustachian tubes . The tubes let mucus drain from the middle ear into the throat.

    A cold, throat infection, acid reflux, or allergies can make the eustachian tubes swell. This blocks the mucus from draining. Then, or grow in the mucus and make pus, which builds up in the middle ear.

    When doctors refer to an ear infection, they usually mean otitis media rather than swimmer’s ear . Otitis media with effusion is when noninfected fluid builds up in the ear. It might not cause symptoms, but in some kids, the fluid creates a sensation of ear fullness or “popping.”

    When Else Are Antibiotics Needed

    Middle Ear Infections Chart 22x28

    Antibiotics can be the right treatment for kids who get a lot of ear infections. Their doctors might prescribe daily antibiotics to help prevent future infections. And younger children or those with more severe illness may need antibiotics right from the start.

    The “wait-and-see” approach also might not apply to children with other concerns, such as cleft palate, genetic conditions such as Down syndrome, or other illnesses such as immune system disorders.

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    What Causes A Middle

    The middle ear connects to the throat by a canal called the eustachiantube. This tube helps even out the pressure between the outer ear and theinner ear. A cold or allergy can irritate the tube or cause the area aroundit to swell. This can keep fluid from draining from the middle ear. Thefluid builds up behind the eardrum. Bacteria and viruses can grow in thisfluid. The bacteria and viruses cause the middle-ear infection.

    Otitis Media In Adults

    Otitis media is another name for a middle ear infection. It means an infection behind your eardrum. This kind of ear infection can happen after any condition that keeps fluid from draining from the middle ear. These conditions include allergies, a cold, a sore throat, or a respiratory infection.

    Middle ear infections are common in children, but they can also happen in adults. An ear infection in an adult may mean a more serious problem than in a child. So you may need additional tests. If you have an ear infection, you should see your healthcare provider for treatment. If they happen repeatedly, you should see an otolaryngologist or an otologist .

    What are the types of middle ear infections?

    Infections can affect the middle ear in several ways. They are:

    Who is more likely to get a middle ear infection?

    You are more likely to get an ear infection if you:

    • Smoke or are around someone who smokes
    • Have seasonal or year-round allergy symptoms
    • Have a cold or other upper respiratory infection

    What causes a middle ear infection?

    The middle ear connects to the throat by a canal called the eustachian tube. This tube helps even out the pressure between the outer ear and the inner ear. A cold or allergy can irritate the tube or cause the area around it to swell. This can keep fluid from draining from the middle ear. The fluid builds up behind the eardrum. Bacteria and viruses can grow in this fluid. The bacteria and viruses cause the middle ear infection.

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    How Is A Middle

    Your health care provider will take a medical history and do a physicalexam. He or she will look at the outer ear and eardrum with an otoscope.The otoscope is a lighted tool that lets your provider see inside the ear.A pneumatic otoscope blows a puff of air into the ear to check how wellyour eardrum moves. If you eardrum doesnt move well, it may mean you havefluid behind it.

    Your provider may also do a test called tympanometry. This test tells howwell the middle ear is working. It can find any changes in pressure in themiddle ear. Your provider may test your hearing with a tuning fork.

    What Causes Otitis Media

    Ear Infection Pain Treatment in an Adult | Auburn Medical Group

    Otitis media usually starts with a cold or a sore throat caused by bacteria or a virus. The infection spreads through the back of the throat to the middle ear, to which it is connected by the eustachian tube. The infection in the middle ear causes swelling and fluid build-up, which puts pressure on the eardrum.

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    Who Is Most Likely To Get An Ear Infection

    Middle ear infection is the most common childhood illness . Ear infections occur most often in children who are between age 3 months and 3 years, and are common until age 8. Some 25% of all children will have repeated ear infections.

    Adults can get ear infections too, but they dont happen nearly as often as they do in children.

    Risk factors for ear infections include:

    • Age: Infants and young children are at greater risk for ear infections.
    • Family history: The tendency to get ear infections can run in the family.
    • Colds: Having colds often increases the chances of getting an ear infection.
    • Allergies: Allergies cause inflammation of the nasal passages and upper respiratory tract, which can enlarge the adenoids. Enlarged adenoids can block the eustachian tube, preventing ear fluids from draining. This leads to fluid buildup in the middle ear, causing pressure, pain and possible infection.
    • Chronic illnesses: People with chronic illnesses are more likely to develop ear infections, especially patients with immune deficiency and chronic respiratory disease, such as cystic fibrosis and asthma.
    • Ethnicity: Native Americans and Hispanic children have more ear infections than other ethnic groups.

    When Should I See A Doctor About A Fungal Ear Infection

    Fungal ear infections usually cause a fair amount of discomfort and discharge so most people want to see a doctor soon after the condition starts. There are some eardrops available from pharmacies, but the best they can do is reduce the inflammation a bit. In fungal infections, they don’t usually have much effect.

    See a doctor sooner rather than later if:

    • You are in a lot of pain.
    • Your ear produces a lot of discharge.
    • You feel generally unwell or develop unusual symptoms such as dizziness.
    • You have a high temperature.
    • The outer part of your ear looks very mucky.
    • Your hearing becomes muffled.
    • You’ve bought some treatment from the chemist which hasn’t worked.

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    How Does A Doctor Diagnose A Middle Ear Infection

    The first thing a doctor will do is ask you about your childs health. Has your child had a head cold or sore throat recently? Is he having trouble sleeping? Is she pulling at her ears? If an ear infection seems likely, the simplest way for a doctor to tell is to use a lighted instrument, called an otoscope, to look at the eardrum. A red, bulging eardrum indicates an infection.

    A doctor also may use a pneumatic otoscope, which blows a puff of air into the ear canal, to check for fluid behind the eardrum. A normal eardrum will move back and forth more easily than an eardrum with fluid behind it.

    Tympanometry, which uses sound tones and air pressure, is a diagnostic test a doctor might use if the diagnosis still isnt clear. A tympanometer is a small, soft plug that contains a tiny microphone and speaker as well as a device that varies air pressure in the ear. It measures how flexible the eardrum is at different pressures.

    When Should I See My Healthcare Provider

    Chiropractic Care for Ear Infections Handouts Notepad

    You should schedule a visit with a healthcare provider if symptoms dont improve within three days or if you develop a fever of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit, or 38 degrees Celsius, or higher.

    A note from Cleveland Clinic

    Inner ear infections can cause worrisome symptoms such as vertigo, dizziness and balance problems. Most inner ear infections go away within two weeks with proper treatment. Your healthcare provider can confirm your diagnosis, determine an appropriate treatment plan and recommend ways to manage your symptoms.

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    Treating Outer Ear Infections

    The outer ear should be carefully cleaned. That should be followed by the application of antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory medications on your ear.

    Antibiotics may be prescribed if your doctor determines that the infection is bacterial.

    If the infection is fungal, your doctor may prescribe an antifungal medication.

    If you have a viral infection, you may simply need to tend to the irritation on your ear and wait for the infection to resolve itself. Depending on the type of virus involved, more specialized treatment may be necessary.

    To help prevent an ear infection of any kind, follow these tips:

    • Make sure you dry your ears completely after swimming or taking a shower.
    • Try quitting smoking, and limit or avoid secondhand smoke when possible.
    • Manage your allergies by avoiding triggers and keeping up with allergy medications.
    • Wash your hands thoroughly, and try to limit contact with people who have colds or other upper respiratory problems.
    • Make sure your vaccines are up to date.

    What Is Middle Ear Infection

    The ear is made up of three different sections: the outer ear, the middle ear, and the inner ear. These parts all work together so you can hear and process sounds. The outer and middle ear are separated by the eardrum a very thin piece of skin that vibrates when hit by sound waves.

    This page deals with middle ear infection , which is the infection / inflammation of the air-filled space behind the eardrum that contains the tiny vibrating bones of the ear. This space can become blocked and filled with mucus , which can become infected, causing inflammation.

    There are two types of middle ear infection:

    • An acute infection that starts suddenly and lasts for a short period of time and
    • A chronic ear infection that does not get better or keeps coming back. Chronic ear infection can result in long-term damage to the ear.

    Sometimes gel-like fluid will remain in the middle ear after an ear infection, causing “glue ear“, a relatively common condition that is often undetected among New Zealand pre-schoolers. Glue ear can adversely affect hearing and may take several weeks to resolve.

    Outer ear infection is characteristically different to middle ear infection. This is a skin infection in the outer ear canal, which may start as an itch and develop into infection causing inflammation. Sometimes referred to as swimmers ear, this kind of infection can normally be treated effectively with ear drops from your doctor or pharmacist.

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    Complications And Emergency Symptoms

    If an outer ear infection goes untreated and doesnt heal on its own, it can result in several complications.

    Abscesses can develop around the affected area within the ear. These may heal on their own, or your doctor may need to drain them.

    Long-term outer ear infections can cause narrowing of the ear canal. Narrowing can affect the hearing and, in extreme cases, cause deafness. It needs to be treated with antibiotics.

    Ruptured or perforated eardrums can also be a complication of outer ear infections caused by items inserted into the ear. This can be extremely painful. Symptoms include temporary hearing loss, ringing or buzzing in the ears, discharge, and bleeding from the ear.

    In rare cases, necrotizing otitis externa occurs. This is an extremely serious complication where the infection spreads to the cartilage and bone that surrounds your ear canal.

    Adults with weakened immune systems are most at risk. Untreated, it can be fatal. This is considered a medical emergency, with symptoms including:

    • severe ear pain and headaches, especially at night
    • ongoing ear discharge

    What Causes A Fungal Ear Infection

    Medical Myth: Ear Infections Require Antibiotics

    Earwax protects the lining of the ear from fungus so anything that reduces the amount of wax will allow a fungal infection to take hold. Eczema of the skin inside the ear can be another risk factor.

    The outside temperature plays a significant part. Fungi grow faster in the heat, so it’s more common in warmer climates. In the UK it occurs more often in summer than in winter.

    9 out of 10 fungal infections are due to a fungus belonging to the Aspergillus species and the rest are caused by a fungus of the Candida species.

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    About Middle Ear Infections

    Otitis media is an infection of the middle ear that causes inflammation and a build-up of fluid behind the eardrum.

    Anyone can develop a middle ear infection but infants between six and 15 months old are most commonly affected.

    It’s estimated that around one in every four children experience at least one middle ear infection by the time they’re 10 years old.

    When To See Your Doctor

    See your doctor if your child:

    • Is six months of age or younger
    • Has a high fever or bad earache
    • Has an ear discharge that lasts more than 24 hours
    • Continues to have fever or bad earache two days after they start treatment
    • Still seems to have trouble hearing after six to eight weeks
    • Seems to be getting worse or you are worried at any time.

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    Differences Between Middle Ear Infection And Outer Ear Infection

    Middle ear infection Outer ear infection
    Middle ear infection Usually affects children Outer ear infection Usually affects adults aged 45 to 75
    Middle ear infection Caused by viruses like colds and flu Outer ear infection Caused by something irritating the ear canal, such as eczema, water or wearing ear plugs
    Middle ear infection Affects the middle ear Outer ear infection Affects the ear canal

    How Is A Fungal Ear Infection Treated

    Middle Ear Infection

    If the inside of your ear looks really messy, the doctor may suggest a clean-up. This has the odd name of aural toilet. It can be done by a doctor or more usually a nurse. It involves gently clearing the ear of discharge using swabs, a suction tube or syringe. This may need to be done several times a week in the first instance. Aural toileting eases discomfort and also helps ear drops to get to the right place. However, it may be a bit uncomfortable while you’re having it done, and you may need to take some painkillers.

    Don’t fiddle with your ear, keep it dry and try to resist scratching inside, however itchy it may be, as this will stop the infection from clearing up. It’s not usually advisable to put a cotton wool plug in the ear unless you get a lot of discharge and you need to keep it under control for the sake of appearances.

    Avoid swimming until the condition clears up.

    Your doctor may prescribe 5% aluminium acetate ear drops. This is also known as Burow’s solution. It’s not an antifungal but is used to calm down inflammation and help remove any muck in your ear.

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    Who Gets Ear Infections

    Ear infections are very common in babies and young children who are more likely to develop them than older children and adults. This is because their eustachian tubes don’t function as well as in older children and adults – the tubes are smaller, shorter and flatter .

    As children grow older, their eustachian tubes work better and they get fewer colds. As a result, they outgrow the tendency to have ear infections at around 7 years of age. But, some children may have problems beyond this age.

    What Causes Middle Ear Infections

    Most middle ear infections occur when an infection such as a cold, leads to a build-up of mucus in the middle ear and causes the Eustachian tube to become swollen or blocked.

    This mean mucus can’t drain away properly, making it easier for an infection to spread into the middle ear.

    An enlarged adenoid can also block the Eustachian tube. The adenoid can be removed if it causes persistent or frequent ear infections. Read more about removing adenoids.

    Younger children are particularly vulnerable to middle ear infections as:

    • the Eustachian tube is smaller in children than in adults
    • a child’s adenoids are relatively much larger than an adults

    Certain conditions can also increase the risk of middle ear infections, including:

    • having a cleft palate a type of birth defect where a child has a split in the roof of their mouth
    • having Down’s syndrome a genetic condition that typically causes some level of learning disability and a characteristic range of physical features

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